A retrovirus that infected our ancestors 100 million years ago became a human gene that is expressed in embryos and cancers, and can be detected in the blood of pregnant women. Accumulating evidence suggests potential roles for endogenous retroviruses in early life events, which may affect adult health.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.tim.2017.09.002

Type

Journal article

Journal

Trends Microbiol

Publication Date

11/2017

Volume

25

Pages

876 - 877

Keywords

HEMO, cancer, endogenous retroviruses, in utero, stem cells, Animals, Embryo, Mammalian, Endogenous Retroviruses, Evolution, Molecular, Female, Genome, Human, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Immunity, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Pregnancy, Viral Envelope Proteins